County Transmission Risk Rises, Childhood COVID Vaccines – NBC Chicago – Advice Eating

In another Chicago-area county, the risk of COVID transmission has increased, according to guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

It’s the second county to move up to the moderate risk category this month.

Meanwhile, COVID vaccines for children under 5 are taking another big step forward, but when might answers come for parents?

Here’s what you need to know about the coronavirus pandemic across Illinois today:

Suburban Cook County now at moderate risk of COVID transmission: health officials

The Cook County suburb is now at a “moderate” risk level for COVID transmission, according to area health officials.

The Cook County Department of Health issued an alert Friday afternoon that said “an increase in the number of positive cases” has put the county at the second-highest risk level as determined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Though the county was not listed in the CDC’s latest update of county-to-county transmission risk, the CCDPH said its metrics on Thursday suggest that suburban parts are below the “moderate” risk level.

Read more here.

Illinois coronavirus: 24,000 new cases, 46 deaths in last week as cases continue to rise

Illinois health officials reported 24,646 new COVID-19 cases and 46 other deaths over the past week. That’s an increase in cases but a decrease in deaths since this time last week.

In the previous week, the state reported 19,551 new cases and 58 deaths. The week before, the state reported 14,049 new cases and 45 deaths were reported.

Read more here.

Another Greater Chicago County Rises to “Medium Community Level” for COVID: CDC

As COVID cases continue to rise in Illinois and across the U.S., five Illinois counties are now at intermediate risk for the virus, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

As of Friday, Lake, DuPage, Champaign, McLean and Logan counties are all listed below the CDC’s “intermediate” transmission risk level, the second-highest level on the CDC scale. The designation means that elderly or immunocompromised people are encouraged to wear masks in indoor public places.

Last week, four counties were at the middle municipal level. Lake County is the second Chicago area county to advance to Intermediate level.

Read more here.

COVID vaccines for children under 5: when could shots start? The latest time

As Moderna took the next step forward to approve the first COVID shot for children under 5, when could parents expect vaccinations to start?

Frustrated families are impatient for a chance to protect the country’s youngest children as those around them shed masks and other public health precautions – even as highly contagious mutant coronaviruses continue to spread.

The country’s 18 million children under the age of 5 are the only age group not yet eligible for vaccination.

As the race to vaccinate the youngest members of the population rages on, which vaccine works best and when might one be approved?

Here’s what we know so far.

Moderna is asking the FDA to approve its COVID-19 vaccine for children under the age of 6

Moderna on Thursday asked U.S. regulators to approve low doses of its COVID-19 vaccine for children under the age of 6, a long-awaited step toward potentially opening up immunizations to millions of young children by the summer.

Frustrated families are impatient for a chance to protect the country’s youngest children as those around them shed masks and other public health precautions – even as highly contagious mutant coronaviruses continue to spread.

Read more here.

COVID in numbers: Illinois reports more than 3,000 new cases amid pandemic ‘slow down’

Amid comments from top U.S. health officials that the COVID-19 pandemic is “slowing down,” Illinois is still seeing more than 3,000 new cases of the virus a day, according to the state’s latest data.

According to the Illinois Department of Health, the state recorded 3,434 new cases of COVID-19 in the past 24 hours. That slightly lowers the state’s average daily COVID cases, with 3,070 new cases per day, officials said.

Despite the slight drop, the number is still nearly 20% higher than a week ago, according to IDPH data.

Read more here.

Gov. Pritzker on Fauci’s comments on COVID pandemic: ‘Hope and pray he’s accurate’

Illinois Gov. JB Pritzker said he hopes Dr. Anthony Fauci is right when he says the worst of the pandemic may be behind the US, but whether or not current levels can be sustained remains to be seen.

Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, said Wednesday the coronavirus is better under control in the United States, but the pandemic is not over yet.

His comments came a day after he told PBS’ NewsHour that the US was “out of the pandemic phase” and also told the Washington Post that the country was finally “out of the full-blown explosive pandemic phase.”

Read more here.

Chicago COVID metrics: City at ‘low community level’ of transmission even as cases rise

Even as COVID cases increased 26% in the past seven days, Chicago health officials say the city remains at “low risk” of community-level COVID transmission, with hospitalizations largely flat despite the increase in cases stay.

According to the latest data released by the Chicago Department of Public Health, the city has seen an average of 585 new cases of COVID-19 per day for the past week. According to official data, this corresponds to an increase of 26% compared to the previous week.

Read more here.

Cases of subvariants descended from Stealth Omicron continue to increase: CDC

A new version of the Omicron variant continues to spread across the United States, with the Centers for Disease Control estimating the offspring now accounts for nearly a third of cases in the country.

According to the department’s latest estimates on Tuesday, subvariant BA.2.12.1 accounted for an estimated 28.7% of COVID cases in the United States over the past week.

Read more here.

How long have you been contagious with COVID and how soon could symptoms begin? Here’s what you should know

If you have tested positive for or been exposed to coronavirus, when might symptoms appear, how long are you contagious, how long should you quarantine and when should you get tested?

As COVID cases slowly rise in Illinois and parts of the US, local health officials have issued warnings to take precautions, particularly in areas where the risk of transmission is increasing.

In Illinois, the number of new cases of the virus has increased by more than 40% in the last week.

Read more here.

COVID or allergies? Here’s how to tell the difference in symptoms

With the high levels of tree pollen floating through the air and lingering COVID variants, it can be difficult to identify the cause of the runny nose and fatigue.

Before self-diagnosing, health officials have said the best way to identify the disease is through testing, especially given the overlap of some symptoms between the coronavirus and seasonal allergies.

So how can you tell a difference between the two?

Here is a list of COVID and allergy symptoms as described by the CDC.

COVID in numbers: Illinois sees a 40% increase in cases in the last 7 days

A recent spike in the number of COVID cases in Illinois continued unabated this week as the state saw a more than 40% surge in new cases of the virus.

According to the latest data from the Illinois Department of Health, the state has seen an average of 3,136 new cases per day for the past seven days. That’s up 43.1% over the past week, up from 2,191 cases per day last Monday.

Daily case counts in the state have increased by 170% in the last month, according to IDPH data.

Read more here.

Is there a connection between severe hepatitis in children, adenovirus and coronavirus?

Last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a statewide public health alert to doctors across the country, urging doctors to be on the lookout for unusual cases of severe childhood liver disease and infections.

On Monday, the Illinois Department of Public Health issued an alert that 3 possible cases of the mystery disease had been detected in Illinois – 2 in suburban Chicago and 1 in western Illinois.

Although it’s not entirely clear what causes the mysterious diseases, a prime suspect is actually the adenovirus.

One avenue of inquiry being explored is that the outbreak could be linked to a rise in common viral infections following the phasing out of COVID-19 restrictions. Children who have not been exposed to adenovirus in the past two years may now be hit harder when exposed to the viruses.

Read more here.

How soon after exposure do COVID symptoms begin?

As cases of the coronavirus rise in Illinois and across the country, in part due to the now dominant Omicron subvariant BA.2, the risk of being exposed to someone with COVID also increases. But when might the first symptoms appear after a possible exposure?

Some experts say the Omicron variant “speeded up” the timing for what many once knew with COVID, including the incubation period, or the time between exposure and the onset of symptoms. Late last year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance on quarantine and isolation was updated to reflect this change.

Read more here.

Here is the One Chicago-Area County at the mid-level COVID community

Although COVID-19 cases have increased across Illinois, most states and the Chicago area remain at low community levels.

However, some counties were listed in the middle category based on rising metrics including the COVID case rate, new admissions and occupied inpatient beds used by patients with confirmed COVID-19.

Read more here.

CDC guidelines for COVID exposure: What you should know about quarantine times and symptoms

After being exposed to or testing positive for COVID-19, how long should you quarantine from others and when might symptoms appear?

As cases and now deaths and hospitalizations slowly rise in Illinois and parts of the US, local health officials have issued warnings to take precautions, especially in areas where the risk of transmission is increasing.

Here’s a look at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidance on what to do if you test positive or think you’ve been exposed to someone who has. This guidance was last updated at the end of March.

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