In a quiver of kinetic jewelry – Advice Eating

Wearing a piece of jewelery should be a multi-sensory experience: the warmth of gold on the skin, the glitter of precious stones, the clinking of stacked bracelets or the swinging of long earrings. This interaction is amplified when moving parts are involved in the construction – a design feature that is increasingly and excitingly appearing in today’s jewelry.

“Movement reflects the dynamism and energy of the wearer,” says Marie Cabirou, the Parisian designer behind Marie Mas. Cabirou worked with Raf Simons at Dior, designing ready-to-wear and couture jewelry before launching her own brand and exploring the creative and technical possibilities she found in fashion: rings that twist back and forth , or gems popping out of their gold grooves when worn on the finger.

Kinetic jewelry can be traced back to the 18th century when diamond brooches and hair ornaments were set and tremble, or mounted on springs to tremble with every movement of the wearer. But it wasn’t until the 1960s that conceptual, cerebrally moving gems emerged from the hands of Friedrich Becker and Pol Bury as part of the kinetic art movement. Today, original specimens are coveted by collectors, explains London dealer Didier, particularly Pol Bury’s creations, in which gold spheres wobble across mirrored gold surfaces or clusters of gold pins float and fall in perpetual motion.

It was Chopard who first unleashed diamonds in 1976 with the Happy Diamonds watch, in which the stones rolled around the face of the watch. Today the same dynamic principle is used in a broader collection that includes pendants, earrings, bangles and rings.

Yael Sonia, rose gold perpetual motion tiered earrings, £5,950

Hattie Rickard's 18k gold, multicolored sapphire and ruby ​​Rupix ring, £12,550

Hattie Rickard’s 18k gold, multicolored sapphire and ruby ​​Rupix ring, £12,550

Nina Runsdorf Flip Ring, £2,700

Nina Runsdorf Flip Ring, £2,700

The sliding playfulness of the abacus, with its satisfying clicks, is part of the appeal of Messika’s Move collection, which has diamonds rolling in an open slab thanks to a concealed track. Founder and artistic director Valérie Messika, daughter of a Diamantaire, says the idea stemmed from her childhood memories of playing with gemstones. Originally designed as a bangle, Move is now a signature of the house, which has spawned several collections including Lucky Move, which has the free-running diamonds set in a polished gold medallion.

Likewise, in her Perpetual Motion collection, designer Yael Sonia takes colored gemstones from her native Brazil and slides them in elegant, graphic, openwork structures. “Setting the loose elements in a ring or pendant in motion is a ritual gesture,” says Sonia, adding that the melodic sounds of tapping and rolling create her own personal soundtrack for the wearer.

Bucherer Fine Jewelery Dizzler ring, £11,900

Bucherer Fine Jewelery Dizzler ring, £11,900

Piaget Possession band ring, £25,900

Piaget Possession band ring, £25,900

As long as LuckyNumber and Cog8, £27,000

As long as LuckyNumber and Cog8, £27,000

The best kinetic jewelry is so tactile that it invites the wearer to spin, fidget, fidget and play with the pieces as a rhythmic antidote to fear. The idea for the Dizzler ring from Bucherer Fine Jewelery apparently came to one of Bucherer Fine Jewellery’s in-house designers after observing people in a waiting room, absentmindedly twisting their rings in nervous concentration.

“Jewellery has to be part of the wearer in some way, not just an accessory,” explains jeweler Solange Azagury-Partridge. “I’ve always loved jewelry that makes a difference while you’re wearing it, that can become part of your body language.”

Jacques Bugin for Galerie Maeght Douze Anneaux sur Quatre Tiges bracelet, 1971, £30,000, didierltd.com
Jacques Bugin for Galerie Maeght Douze Anneaux sur Quatre Tiges bracelet, 1971, £30,000, didierltd.com

Dior Joaillerie Necklace Dior à Versailles Salon D'Apollon in yellow, white and rose gold, silver, diamonds and yellow diamonds, POA

Dior Joaillerie Necklace Dior à Versailles Salon D’Apollon in yellow, white and rose gold, silver, diamonds and yellow diamonds, POA

Chopard Happy Diamonds pendant, £7,140

Chopard Happy Diamonds pendant, £7,140

Even the larger Maisons have their makers. Dior’s Victoire de Castellane was revived and tremble for the Salon d’Apollon suite of her Haute Joaillerie collection Dior à Versailles, in which the yellow diamond sunbeams tremble and shimmer as if from flickering candlelight. The central micropavé diamond band of the De Beers Horizon ring circles back and forth between graphic, minimalist gold bands. This year, Piaget revisits its Possession collection, originally launched in 1990 with a gold ring on which the central band rotates freely with a discreet finger movement, a ritual meant to accompany a wish or a confirmation, or whatever CEO Benjamin Comar says: “a secret feature that only the wearer knows about”.

From top: De Beers Horizon Ring in gold and diamonds, £3,650, Horizon Ring in white gold and diamonds, £3,650 and Horizon Ring in white gold and diamonds, £6,200

From top: De Beers Horizon Ring in gold and diamonds, £3,650, Horizon Ring in white gold and diamonds, £3,650 and Horizon Ring in white gold and diamonds, £6,200

Michael Berger Kinetic Ring, £1,780, kineticrings.com

Michael Berger Kinetic ring, £1,780

Marie Mas King Wave ring, €8,000

Marie Mas King Wave ring, €8,000

However, the most theatrical kinetic jewels come from Düsseldorf-based Michael Berger, who takes inspiration from the energy of the body and describes movement as the fourth dimension of a jewel. “When there are two axes, the interaction between two moving parts is chaotic, totally random. The ring gives the wearer the best momentum and gives the wearer the best opportunity to play and interact with them.”

The effect is startling, even disturbing, as a curved gold disc pirouettes on the finger, or a polished steel disc dances on a shaped steel ring. Berger admits that reactions are polarized. “Some people are insane with the constant movement, others find it calming,” he says. Still others, like me, just think it’s poetry in motion.

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